Forgetting to Remember

Posted in: Alumni Career Services- Jan 15, 2012 Comments Off on Forgetting to Remember

Online webinar
Tuesday, January 17, 2012, 12:30 – 1:30pm

Another American develops Alzheimer’s disease every 69 seconds. In 2050, an American will develop the disease every 33 seconds. Estimates vary, but experts suggest that as many as 5.1 million Americans may have Alzheimer’s disease. It not only affects those with the disease but the family members & caregivers that surround them. Tune in to this webinar to learn about the latest research in Alzheimer’s disease, including what changes to the brain cause its symptoms, what proteins are important to its onset, & what factors protect against it. Georgetown has long been a leader in Alzheimer’s research. Our Memory Disorders Program is home to one of the largest clinical trials programs in the nation & Georgetown is home to experts in the role of genetics & gene therapies in Alzheimer’s disease, the role of traumatic brain injury in developing Alzheimer’s disease & biomarkers for Alzheimer’s. Although there are few treatments now available, clinical trials for new drugs are continuing & our basic understanding is advancing. In this webinar, Dr. G. William Rebeck, Ph.D., Professor in Georgetown University’s Department of Neuroscience, will review what is going on in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients & provide some basic understanding of new research to treat & prevent this disease.

Dr. Rebeck is an expert on genetic risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. Rebeck is from Cincinnati, OH, where he was taught by the Jesuits at St. Xavier High School. He received a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University (majoring in Chemistry) & a PhD from Harvard University (in Toxicology). He began studying Alzheimer’s disease in 1991 in Germany on a Fulbright Fellowship & then did research for over ten years at Massachusetts General Hospital. He came to Georgetown University in 2003.

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