Regulations for Nanosafety: Maximizing Benefits of Technology, While Minimizing Risk

Posted in: Alumni Career Services- Jan 19, 2014 Comments Off on Regulations for Nanosafety: Maximizing Benefits of Technology, While Minimizing Risk

Online
Tuesday, January 21, 2014, 12:30 – 1:30pm

Join Ilise Feitshans (L’83), Scholar in Law of Health at the University of Lausanne Institute for Work and Health, and a doctoral candidate in International Relations in Geneva, for a lecture on the nanotechnology revolution.

Nanotechnology’s revolution for commerce can also revolutionize public health. It is expected to represent about three trillion dollars of USA GDP by 2015. The sheer economic importance of nanotechnology will change several antiquated systems regarding industrial processes, scientific understanding and categorization of chemical informatics, and ultimately, the health care delivery systems that must use or correct the end products of these changes. Yet, scientists and governments agree that the application of nanotechnology to commerce poses important potential risks to human health and the environment, but the risks are unknown.

Against a remarkable backdrop of pre-existing social change regarding the rights, nature and social behaviors surrounding health and disability in the late twentieth century, Nanomedicine will change the rules of the game of disability treatment, definition under law for insurance, and long-term prognosis for rehabilitation.

Ilise L Feitshans (L’83) JD, ScM, currently serves as the Scholar in Law of Health at the University of Lausanne Institute for Work and Health, and as a doctoral candidate in International Relations in Geneva Switzerland “Forecasting Nanotechnology Law: Risk Management Protecting Public Health Under International Law”. Previously, Feitshans was the Acting Director of the Legislative Drafting Research Fund at the Columbia University School of Law in New York City. As a bilingual lawyer, she has also worked on U.S. Supreme Court cases about occupational health.

In addition to her training as a GULC graduate, Ilise has a Masters of Science in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University. Her current studies address laws that protect the universal human right to health, by regulating emerging risks from nanotechnology. Her current researchhas been awarded the Alice Hamilton Fellowship for a woman studying international health law at the Geneva School of Diplomacy. She provided public discourse for the forum “Law and Science of Nanotechnology: Perfect together” at the Musuem of the History of Sciences, Geneva Switzerland , and has commented on text for the EU, WHO, NIOSH and the Council of Europe.

Feitshans served on the U.S. Department of Energy Beryllium Rulemaking Advisory Commission and as Coordinatrice for the ILO Encyclopaedia of Occupational Health and Safety 5th edition at the United Nations, Geneva Switzerland. Feitshans served as co-instructor at the 2011 International Nanotechnology Conference in Boston. She has written two books and produced three safety and health videos. She is a member of the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States. In 2011, Feitshans was profiled in the book, “100 women Making a Difference in SH&E” by the American Society of Safety Engineers.

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